Hegel the consummate Neoplatonist – Preface

Processed in a convict culture that has everything but a bigness of spirit, that oozes shame like pus from a boil; a culture overseen by ruthless, thieving ideologues who know they must never lose control of the ideas but too gutless to go near mysticism while the career pathways of modernism and po-mo rode high (themselves suffused with mysticism) and vicious, vindictive authoritarians, protected by their mates and their system – a nation that as much toadies to the interests of first British and now U.S. capital – from the skirts of Mother Britannia to the coat-tails of Uncle Sam – as it is a racist bully in its region.

A people who have everything and yet, convinced of their ‘decency’, behave as though they have nothing.

Till the end of my life I will salute Jørn Utzon for his bigness of spirit, for his vision and his masterpiece that resulted from it, in his being driven from this culture and for refusing to ever be drawn back by the embarrassed provincial rabble (still attempting to demean what he created by proposing to raise petty cash from sleepovers in it – why not in St Mary’s or Parliament House – symbols of authority?) that his departure exposed.

red-star

Contents of Hegel the consummate Neoplatonist posts

7 thoughts on “Hegel the consummate Neoplatonist – Preface

    • Hi Yi Ping Wang,
      thanks for your comment. In my view, the need is not for heroes but for people to do the hardest thing possible and think for themselves.

      The difficulty of thinking for oneself – and the challenge of almost immediately beginning to uncover and having to confront and overcome one’s inevitable prejudices beats that of climbing Meru any day.

      The need is to come up against and push beyond the boundaries (often unspoken) set by the representatives of those whose interests may well be served at the expense of one’s own or are diametrically opposed to them, and to test in practice the continuing refinement of one’s thought.
      Best wishes, Phil

      Liked by 1 person

      • I just found the following on internet, while searched ‘this world needs heroes’. I quite like this passage, hope you enjoy it too.

        “A leading psychologist and originator of the Stanford Prison Experiment is applying his understanding of evil to the promotion of good.

        What is a hero? I argue that a hero is someone who possesses and displays certain heroic attributes such as integrity, compassion, and moral courage, heightened by an understanding of the power of situational forces, an enhanced social awareness, and an abiding commitment to social action.

        Heroism is a social concept, and—like any social concept—it can be explained, taught, and modeled through education and practice. I believe that heroism is common, a universal attribute of human nature and not exclusive to a few special individuals. The heroic act is extraordinary, the heroic actor is an ordinary person—until he or she becomes a heroic special individual. We may all be called upon to act heroically at some time, when opportunity arises. We would do well, as a society and as a civilization, to conceive of heroism as something within the range of possibilities for every person.

        But these days rarely do we hear about ordinary men and women who have, by circumstance or fate, done something extraordinary for a greater cause or sacrificed on behalf of fellow human beings. Today’s generation, perhaps more than any preceding one, has grown up without a distinct vision of what constitutes heroism, or, worse, has grown up with a flawed vision of the hero as sports figure, rock star, gang leader, or fantastic super hero.”

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Yi Ping Wang,
        thank you for your sincere and excellent comment.

        Utzon certainly fits the description of ‘hero.’ My regard for him is because he was a man of vision who designed something for social use that is great and very beautiful – not only visually in its construction but particularly, intellectually.

        Both the design and the construction of the Opera House required new solutions to new problems. That is one way to define ‘vision.’

        I believe he left Australia not simply as a result of his conflict with the Minister for Public Works (this is what Australians tell themselves – ‘It was someone else, your Honour – and only one of them’) but, more broadly, because of his conflict with Australian culture. He saw how the Minister for Public Works embodied that culture.

        This, I think, is the reason he would not return (he didn’t publicly state his position on the matter – to my great regret – and he cited health issues as his reason for not returning) – because he never saw the fundamental change in Australian culture necessary for him to return – the embracing of vision.
        Best wishes, Phil

        Liked by 1 person

  1. I think that in a country where authority expect people to be cowardly and easily deceived, daring to think, to investigate, and to speak truth as we know is indeed a heroic act. Recently I told an agent of an authority that is determined to undermine me, that losing is not to be feared, as if I lose I would have an opportunity to reflect to learn and to grow, and if I give up the fight due to a fear of losing then I would miss a good chance to learn and grow. I loved the look on his face when I said this to him. I know that he was somewhat inspired, yet I also know that he was not game enough to defy his master. In the Chinese philosophical work of Dao De Jing, it was said that when we thrive along the way of dharma (virtue truth and justice) we make contributions and sacrifices, we endure losses and becomes weaker in strength, so much so we become less and less able to do things. However as we grow weaker in strength we grow strong in power, and as we engage in less activities, we achieve more.

    Liked by 1 person

      • You are most welcome dear Phil. Yes Utzon was certain a man of considerable intellectual and moral worth that set him apart from an unfortunately disgusting and destructive culture. Sometimes it is better to run away, yet sometimes battlefields choose the warriors. Here are the lyrics of Tracy Chapman’s Born to Fight. Wrong doers must learn to repent, rectify and reform.

        “Born To Fight”

        They’re tryin’ to take away my pride
        By stripping me of everyhing I own
        They’re tryin’ to hurt me inside
        And make me into a white man’s drone

        But this one’s not for sale
        And I was born to fight
        I ain’t been knocked down yet
        I was born to fight
        I’m the surest bet

        There ain’t no man no woman
        No beast alive that can beat me
        ‘Cause I’m born to fight

        They’re tryin’ to dig into my soul
        And take away the spirit of my god
        They’re tryin’ to take control
        And monitor my every thought

        I won’t let down my guard
        And I was born to fight
        I ain’t been knocked down yet
        I was born to fight
        I’m the surest bet

        There ain’t no man no woman
        No beast alive that can beat me
        ‘Cause I’m born to fight

        Liked by 1 person

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