The Mueller indictment and its parroting in Australia

By Patrick Martin Source: WSWS.org The announcement Friday by the US Department of Justice that a federal grand jury has returned criminal indictments against 13 Russian citizens and three Russian companies, charging illegal activities in the 2016 US presidential election, has become the occasion for a barrage of war propaganda in the American corporate media. […]

via The media and the Mueller indictment: A conspiracy theory to end all conspiracy theories — Desultory Heroics

Again, I highly recommend both the article and video. What is taking place in the US (re- the charge of Russian interference in the US democratic process – that it should even be contemplated should be used in first year psychology as a first-rate example of doublethink) is once again being parroted in Australia by the capitalist class via their political and media lackeys in their less noisy charging of Chinese interference in the democratic process of this country – less noisy because of the dependence of the Ozzie economy and ‘laid-back’ lifestyle on Chinese cash, without which Australia would have been mere bubbles on the surface of the briny after the GFC.

The Ozzies have got to be careful (toadying to their masters while not upsetting the Chinese too much) but you can see the emerging structure – the ‘free world’ once again defending itself from those sly, manipulative communists (the Russians will never be forgiven for having had the first socialist revolution) – as China rises to global domination and the US (capitalist class) inevitably loses the position Trump was put into the presidency to maintain.

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Thought Police for the 21st Century — Desultory Heroics

By Chris Hedges Source: TruthDig The abolition of net neutrality and the use of algorithms by Facebook, Google, YouTube and Twitter to divert readers and viewers from progressive, left-wing and anti-war sites, along with demonizing as foreign agents the journalists who expose the crimes of corporate capitalism and imperialism, have given the corporate state the […]

via Thought Police for the 21st Century — Desultory Heroics

I highly recommend both the article and webinar (in which North’s left hand, frequently patriarchally reaching towards and tapping on Hedges was both informative and distracting).

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 13

Sergei Chekhonin, The Union of Art Workers Aids the Starving. Poster, 1921. ‘In 1921 the Volga region was hit by a terrible famine - the result of an unprecedented drought. Posters, slogans, and newspaper articles called on people to help the starving and to share their last crust of bread with them. People did everything they could and more.’

Sergei Chekhonin, The Union of Art Workers Aids the Starving. Poster, 1921. ‘In 1921 the Volga region was hit by a terrible famine – the result of an unprecedented drought. Posters, slogans, and newspaper articles called on people to help the starving and to share their last crust of bread with them. People did everything they could and more.’

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Image: Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 8

Konstantin Yuon, ‘A New Planet,’ 1921. Tempera on cardboard, The Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Konstantin Yuon, ‘A New Planet,’ 1921. Tempera on cardboard, The Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

‘…it is not difficult to see that ours is a birth-time and a period of transition to a new era. Spirit has broken with the world it has hitherto inhabited and imagined, and is of a mind to submerge it in the past, and in the labour of its own transformation. Spirit is indeed never at rest but always engaged in moving forward. But just as the first breath drawn by a child after its long, quiet nourishment breaks the gradualness of merely quantitative growth – there is a qualitative leap, and the child is born – so likewise the Spirit in its formation matures slowly and quietly into its new shape, dissolving bit by bit the structure of its previous world, whose tottering state is only hinted at by isolated symptoms. The frivolity and boredom which unsettle the established order, the vague foreboding of something unknown, these are the heralds of approaching change. The gradual crumbling that left unaltered the face of the whole is cut short by a sunburst which, in one flash, illuminates the features of the new world.’

G.W.F.Hegel, Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, Trans., A.V.Miller, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1977, 6-7

*

In beginnings and in ends,

artists, let your faith be strong.

Know where hell and heaven await us.

It is your gift to measure all you see

with dispassionate eyes.

Let your gaze be firm and clear.

Rub out the incidental details

and you’ll see the splendour of the world.

Find out where the light shines

and you’ll know where lies the dark.

Let all that’s sacred in the world,

and all that’s wicked, pass in unhurried flow

through the fire of your heart and the cool of

your mind.

Alexander Blok, from the poem ‘Retribution’

Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 14

Ignaty Nivinsky. Cover of the journal Tvorchestvo (Creative Work), 1920, Nos 5-6. The text states 'Journal of literature, art, science and life.'

Ignaty Nivinsky. Cover of the journal Tvorchestvo (Creative Work), 1920, Nos 5-6. The text states ‘Journal of literature, art, science and life.’

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 12

Vladimir Tatlin. Maquette of Tower or Monument to the Third International, 1919-1920

Vladimir Tatlin. Maquette of Tower or Monument to the Third International, 1919-1920

We are the wonder makers.

The sunbeams we shall tie

in radiant brooms, and sweep

the clouds from the sky

with electricity.

We shall make honey-sweet the rivers of the world.

The streets of earth we’ll pave with radiant stars…

Vladimir Mayakovsky, Mystery-Bouffe, 1918

Screen Shot 2014-09-18 at 4.01.53 PM 2

 

 

Tatlin's tower from The guardian.com 2

‘…the spiral is the line of movement of mankind liberated. The spiral is the ideal expression of liberation. With its heel set against the ground, it escapes from the ground and becomes a sign of the renunciation of all animal, earthly and low ambitions.’

Nikolai Punin, 1920

Vladimir Tatlin. Letatlin, 1930-32

Vladimir Tatlin. Letatlin, 1930-1933

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Image sources: First/Second/Third/Fourth

Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 11

Fiodor Fiodorovsky. Decor design for Bizet's opera Carmen, 1922. Gouache, lead white and varnish. Museum of the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow

Fiodor Fiodorovsky. Decor design for Bizet’s opera Carmen, 1922. Gouache, lead white and varnish. Museum of the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow

Isaac Rabinovich. Set for Aristophanes' comedy Lysistrata, 1923. Bakhrushin Theatre Museum, Moscow

Isaac Rabinovich. Set for Aristophanes’ comedy Lysistrata, 1923. Bakhrushin Theatre Museum, Moscow

Ignaty Nivinsky. Decor design for Gozzi's play Princess Turandot, 1922. Watercolour on paper. Bakhrushin Theatre Museum, Moscow

Ignaty Nivinsky. Decor design for Gozzi’s play Princess Turandot, 1922. Watercolour on paper. Bakhrushin Theatre Museum, Moscow

Liubov Popova. Set for Crommelynck's farce The Magnanimous Cuckold, 1922. Bakhrushin Theatre Museum, Moscow

Liubov Popova. Set for Crommelynck’s farce The Magnanimous Cuckold, 1922. Bakhrushin Theatre Museum, Moscow

Varvara Stepanova. Photograph of performance of Tarelkin's Death, 1922.

Varvara Stepanova’s set design. Photograph of performance of Tarelkin’s Death, 1922.

Top four images: Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

Bottom image: The Avant-Garde in Russia, 1910-1930: New Perspectives, Eds., Stephanie Barron and Maurice Tuchman, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1980

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 10

Pupils of children's communes taking part in a mass spectacle in Palace Square, Petrograd, 1918

Pupils of children’s communes taking part in a mass spectacle in Palace Square, Petrograd, 1918

 ‘We Russians are living through an epoch which has few equals in epic scale…

An artist’s job, an artist’s obligation is to see what is conceived, to hear that music with which ‘the air torn up by the wind’ resounds…

What then is conceived?

To redo everything. To arrange things so that everything becomes new; so that the false, dirty, dull, ugly life which is ours becomes a just life, pure, gay, beautiful…

‘Peace and the brotherhood of nations’ – that is the banner beneath which the Russian revolution is taking place. For this its torrent thunders on. This is the music which they who have ears to hear must hear…

With all your body, all your heart, and all your mind, listen to the Revolution.’

Alexander Blok, from the article ‘The Intelligentsia and the Revolution’ 1918

Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 9

Nathan Altman, Design for Alexander Column celebrating the Red Army's 1st Anniversary, Petrograd, 1919

Natan Altman, Design for Alexander Column celebrating the Red Army’s first anniversary, Petrograd, 1919

Natan Altman. Decoration for the Winter Palace, 1918. Collage and watercolour, Russian Museum, Leningrad

Natan Altman. Decoration for the Winter Palace, 1918. Collage and watercolour, Russian Museum, Leningrad

Nathan Altman, The Alexander Column Lit Up at Night, Crayons and chalk on paper, The Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Natan Altman, The Alexander Column Lit Up at Night, Crayons and chalk on paper, The Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Top: The Avant-Garde in Russia, 1910-1930: New Perspectives, Eds., Stephanie Barron and Maurice Tuchman, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1980

Middle: The Shock of the New: Art and the Century of Change, Robert Hughes, British Broadcasting Corporation, London, 1980

Bottom: Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 7

'Toward a Worldwide Commune': mass performance on the steps of the stock exchange building, Petrograd, 1920

‘Toward a Worldwide Commune’: mass performance on the steps of the stock exchange building, Petrograd, 1920

The Avant-Garde in Russia, 1910-1930: New Perspectives, Eds., Stephanie Barron and Maurice Tuchman, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1980

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