Five Russian souls 1

Konstantin Somov, Portrait of Mikhail Kuzmin, 1909. Water-colours, gouache and whiting on paper pasted on cardboard. The Tretyakov Gallery

Konstantin Somov, Portrait of Mikhail Kuzmin, 1909. Water-colours, gouache and whiting on paper pasted on cardboard. The Tretyakov Gallery

Zinaida Serebriakova, Self-portrait, 1910s. Lead pencil on paper. The Russian Museum

Zinaida Serebriakova, Self-portrait, 1910s. Lead pencil on paper. The Russian Museum

Konstantin Somov, Portrait of Alexander Blok, 1907. Lead pencil, crayons and gouache on paper. The Tretyakov Gallery

Konstantin Somov, Portrait of Alexander Blok, 1907. Lead pencil, crayons and gouache on paper. The Tretyakov Gallery

Boris Kustodiev, Portrait of Georgi Vereisky, 1917. Lead pencil and sanguine on paper. The Russian Museum

Boris Kustodiev, Portrait of Georgi Vereisky, 1917. Lead pencil and sanguine on paper. The Russian Museum

Isaac Brodsky, Portrait of Maria Andreyeva, 1910. Oil on canvas. The I. Brodsky Home Museum.

Isaac Brodsky, Portrait of Maria Andreyeva, 1910. Oil on canvas. The I. Brodsky Home Museum

Source: Russian Portrait of the late 19th-early 20th centuries, I. Pruzhan, V. Kniazeva, Izobrazitelnoye Iskusstvo Publishers, Moscow, 1980

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Art and social life: the Russian Revolution and the creative power of idealism 16

Georgy Vychegzhanin, plate with the monogram 'RSFSR.' 1921

Georgy Vychegzhanin, plate with the monogram ‘RSFSR.’ 1921

Sergei Chekhonin, plate with the emblem of the RSFSR. 1921

Sergei Chekhonin, plate with the emblem of the RSFSR. 1921

Bazilka Radonič, 'The New Government.' Plate. 1921

Bazilka Radonič, ‘The New Government.’ Plate. 1921

Alexandra Shchekatikhina-Pototskaya, 'Bell Ringer.' Dish. 1921

Alexandra Shchekatikhina-Pototskaya, ‘Bell Ringer.’ Dish. 1921

Sergei Chekhonin, 'Coral Ribbon.' Plate. 1919

Sergei Chekhonin, ‘Coral Ribbon.’ Plate. 1919

Source: Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

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The battle for art – part six: the ideological function of a stamp

stamp

Stamp of the RSFSR, The Liberated Proletarian, 1921

Stamp of the RSFSR, The Liberated Proletarian, 1921

Top image

Bottom image: Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

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Be daring now and forever

Rudolf Vilde, Plate with the inscription ‘Be daring now and forever.’ 1921

Rudolf Vilde, Plate with the inscription ‘Be daring now and forever.’ 1921

Art of the October Revolution, Compiler, Mikhail Guerman, Trans., W.Freeman, D.Saunders, C.Binns, Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad, 1986

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Blue Mountains National Park

View past rockfall to Mt. Solitary

View past rockfall to Mt. Solitary

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Newnes 3

Newnes woman

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Newnes 2

Original 2

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Newnes 1

Proof sheet

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Friends, Romans, countrymen…

Face

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Aussie culture, convict culture

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The Sun-Herald, 24.05.15 ‘Michael Holding says sledging could lead to on-field fight if cricket authorities don’t step in’, Daniel Lane

West Indies great Michael Holding fears sledging could lead to the ugly spectacle of top-flight cricket’s first fight on the pitch and admitted he would never have accepted the verbal abuse dished out by players such as David Warner during the Australian summer.

Holding, 61, said the amount of aggression in matches was unacceptable and he grinned when asked if he was ever sledged by an opponent when he was a member of the West Indies pace attacks of the 1970s and 1980s.

“Not if they wanted to survive,” he said. “When I played I cannot remember any sledging. Obviously one or two people would pass a remark or two but what I see now, whenever people are walking off the cricket field, people are in their face saying whatever they’re saying.

“If that happened to me … I was a little bit hot-blooded when I was a young man bowling fast and if that happened on the cricket field then it wouldn’t have ended there.

“This idea once you get off the cricket field everything is fine. No, you don’t get personal with me and then get off the field and we’ll be friends. No. No, no. no.”

The paceman, who was nicknamed Whispering Death by English umpire Dickie Bird because he couldn’t hear the Jamaican speedster as he ran in to bowl, fears the world will soon witness the unthinkable, two opponents in the so-called gentleman’s game trading punches over a sledge that cut too close to the bone.

“One day someone will do it,” he replied when asked about the possibility of an on-field fight. “When you are on the cricket field you’re supposed to be batting and bowling, [but] there’s nothing wrong with talking to people and having a joke and even passing a sarcastic remark during a game, because I’ve seen that, I’ve heard it.

“But you don’t get personal with people. Something is going to happen one day and then they’ll realise they’ve gone too far.”…

Holding, who is a patron for the Learning for a Better World (LBW) Trust charity, which pays for education in the Third World, helps youth in Jamaica by providing scholarships on the condition the money was not used to improve their sporting prowess.

“The money goes into an account in their parents’ or guardian’s name and the building society pays the bills,” he said. “Invoices are provided whether they’re for lunches, books, uniforms, but I don’t want them to use that money to buy a cricket bat because the aim of the scholarship is for them to improve their life, not their cricket, because you have some mediocre people who are cricketers and I want to build quality people for Jamaica.”

Australia Swift cartoon 2

The Sun-Herald 24.05.15

ozegal001 2

Photo: The Sydney Morning Herald, n.d.

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Source: article